Illustration based on a NY Times article, "Is it O.K. to Kill Cyclists?" by Daniel Duane.
Also, loosely based on the arcade game, Cruis’n USA- which was played heavily, along with Metal Slug and Samurai Showdown, while waiting for a table at the local chain restaurant, Red Robin. 
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Illustration based on a NY Times article, "Is it O.K. to Kill Cyclists?" by Daniel Duane.

Also, loosely based on the arcade game, Cruis’n USA- which was played heavily, along with Metal Slug and Samurai Showdown, while waiting for a table at the local chain restaurant, Red Robin.

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This weeks to do list. 
Also, health insurance and Anne Frank. 

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This weeks to do list.

Also, health insurance and Anne Frank.

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Paul Pope fan art!
What a fun time I had putting this together! Thanks to Dave at the Destroy Comics tumblr for putting this contest on. Hoping Escapo tides me over until some more Battling Boy comes out.

Paul Pope fan art!

What a fun time I had putting this together! Thanks to Dave at the Destroy Comics tumblr for putting this contest on. Hoping Escapo tides me over until some more Battling Boy comes out.

Pets Or Livestock? A Moral Divide Over Horse Slaughter  by Frank Morris (NPR’s The Salt)*
*I was not hired by NPR, just wanted to do it

Pets Or Livestock? A Moral Divide Over Horse Slaughter  by Frank Morris (NPR’s The Salt)*

*I was not hired by NPR, just wanted to do it

Sketch that turned into something more than a sketch…cause that’s how things go sometimes. Character from the upcoming personal thingy I’m working on.

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Sketch that turned into something more than a sketch…cause that’s how things go sometimes. Character from the upcoming personal thingy I’m working on.

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Received my copy of Killian Eng's Object 10 book yesterday. The work is neck deep into another universe. There’s something strange about seeing someones work so often on a computer screen, and finally getting those pixels into a wonderful corporeal form. I also love that I have no idea what Killian Eng looks like- there’s only an association to a body of work. I keep looking at it and wanting an animated series to take me further into Killian’s mind. 
And on another note, Andrew Hem has a new book that I need to get. Why are art books so great??? I don’t need a huge house or a fancy car or any of that crap, I just want Criterion movies, music, books, and art books. Maybe some good food too, but let’s not get greedy here.

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Received my copy of Killian Eng's Object 10 book yesterday. The work is neck deep into another universe. There’s something strange about seeing someones work so often on a computer screen, and finally getting those pixels into a wonderful corporeal form. I also love that I have no idea what Killian Eng looks like- there’s only an association to a body of work. I keep looking at it and wanting an animated series to take me further into Killian’s mind.

And on another note, Andrew Hem has a new book that I need to get. Why are art books so great??? I don’t need a huge house or a fancy car or any of that crap, I just want Criterion movies, music, books, and art books. Maybe some good food too, but let’s not get greedy here.

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The Hair Up There

Personally a fan of the bottom far left do (The Jane Fonda mullet).

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I had a blast Tuesday night because I made myself agave margaritas, and just drew hairstyles for a character listening to The JV Club podcast. Extreme bonus- I was researching fashion from the 60’s and ran into some incredible spreads from a Japanese magazine called Young Woman. Plus, researching for images of the gorgeous Jane Fonda, Edie Sedgwick, and Anna Karina (who I have the hugest crush on).


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This is not a post.

As the shape of my personal project begins to reveal its form I find myself tackling bigger questions that I didn’t expect to cross paths with.

The story in itself had been such a long process. There were points that I just wanted to throw my computer on the ground and just give it up. Facing up to difficulties in illustration and figuring out what’s needed seems like such a more familiar beast than with writing. With writing, I need to figure out where the story is going, the psychology that comes with each character, convincing dialogue, making it flow, funneling in what I like and don’t like through every movie or book or TV show I’ve experienced. All of this while keeping out of my own head. Even as I write this, I’m frustrated! But I got it done.

All through the writing process and character designs, I’ve been toiling with how to marry together art and words in the back of my mind. Each has its own unique abilities and both are transitional elements that change from objective to subjective. I always think that one of the best (best, maybe because of how recognizable the piece) examples of this is Magritte’s The Treachery of Images, aka “Ceci n’est pas une pipe/This is not a pipe”.

It is objectively an oil painting painted between 1928 and 1929 by René Magritte. Objectively it depicts a simple profile of a tobacco pipe with words written in French underneath, “Ceci n’est pas une pipe”. Subjectively, we the viewer cognitively computes the image as a pipe, even though it is not a pipe* (source: Cpt. Obvious). It is, after all a series of methodically smeared oil dirt, and that is all. Isn’t this the essence of storytelling, creating an illusion for a viewer to experience? In this case, both words and images combine to create an entire cognitive dialogue. Each cannot exist without the other, it is a symbiotic relationship. If it were simply a painting depicting a pipe, it would end there. The viewer would understand that the artist might have some ulterior motives, but would not be quite sure at what it was. There would only be a decent painting of a pipe, nothing to write home about. On the other side of that, If it were simply written words, the viewer might wonder what the hell pipe they were talking about. After all, there is no pipe (“Wohhh”- K. Reeves).

Paul Pope, aside from an insanely talented artist, is an amazingly aware and concise writer, especially in regards to all things connected to art. He came out with his retrospective a while ago, PulpHope, and I find myself going back, surprisingly not for the art work, but for the written material. If you can get it from a friend or library or something, do yourself a favor and get it. His understanding of the comics form (which is another marriage between words and art) is unparalleled. Included in PulpHope, he wrote/drew a one page comic about his four understandings of comics:

1.  “Comics” is a visual language. It is a storytelling form.

2.  “Comics” inhabits a place between the nuance of words and the suggestion of images.

3. The art of good comics is doing with words + pictures exactly what you think you’re doing.

4. The comic not yet drawn can hold the forms of the greatest ideas an artist can have.

Now, I’m off to explore what’s possible in my own terms. I will come back soon with some answers to share and a book that will be a marker in that exploration.

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My room

There are two different versions of flooring in my studio/room.

 version 1: clothes

Often a fine cocktail mix of dirty and clean with no lime wedge to be found. Hopefully. This means I’m lazy and usually having an unproductive day.

version 2: paper


Instead of a kindly, boring off-white Berber carpet, I replace it with a fine tiling of papers with drawings, scribbles, and scratches on them. This means I’m having a productive day, but I do increase the likelihood of stepping on something I don’t want to step on.